World War I American aviators and pilots

United States Air Service

USAS History
Summary 1917-1918
Lafayette Escadrille
N.124/Spa.124
1st Observation
1st, 12th, 50th, 88th
1st Pursuit Group
27th, 94th, 95th, 147th
1st Bombardment
96th, 11th, 20th
2nd Pursuit Group
13th, 22nd, 49th, 139th
3rd Pursuit Group
28th, 93rd, 103rd, 213th
4th Pursuit Group
17th, 148th, 25th, 141st
5th Pursuit Group
41st, 138th, 638th
3rd Air Park
255th
. List of Aces

United States Naval Aviation

US Naval Aviation

United States Marine Corps Aviation

US Marine Aviation

Aircraft

World War I fighter planes, bombers and observation planes Nieuport 28 Spad VII Spad XIII Fokker Dr.1 Albatros D.Va Fokker D.VII
Website: Atlanta SEO

E-mail us American

 
Teddy Roosevelt, Jr., Archie Roosevelt, Kermit Roosevelt, Ethel Roosevelt

It is hard to believe that there could be any American First Family that has given more of itself in defense of the United States. Teddy Roosevelt himself was, of course, a war hero. His charge at the head of the Rough Riders in Cuba during the Spanish American war is legendary. Of Teddy Roosevelt's six children, fully five served in World War I. Quentin died in France in World War I. And then Teddy Roosevelt Jr., died in France in World War II.

Teddy Roosevelt Jr. served in France in World War I. There he was gassed and wounded at Soissons. He later served in the US army during World War II as well. As a Brigadier General, he was the highest-ranking officer and only general landing with the initial assault at Normandy on June 6, 1944 - D-Day. He too died in France (of a heart attack) on July 13, 1944, just a month after the Normandy landings and two days short of the 26th anniversary of the death day of his youngest brother Quentin.

Sister Ethel Roosevelt served as a nurse in France.

Quentin was originally buried near his crash site. But he was later reinterred next to Ted. So now both the brothers are buried next to one another at the very moving US military cemetery at Colville-sur-Mer overlooking Omaha Beach, Normandy, France after World War II ended.

Quentin Roosevelt attended Harvard then served his country in war and then died overseas in France at the age of 20, killed flying in 1918.

Yet a third brother was wounded in France: Archie Roosevelt was also awarded the Croix de Guerre and had his arm and knee shattered by enemy bullets while saving the lives of three of his men who had come under fire.

Kermit Roosevelt served with the British Army in the Middle East in World War I.

Quentin's brother Ted Roosevelt, Jr. named his son, born the next year in 1919, Quentin Roosevelt. This Quentin Roosevelt also attended Harvard then served his country in war, being wounded in 1943 in the great battle of Kasserine Pass in North Africa, and later died at the age of 29 overseas in Hong Kong in a plane crash in 1948 three years after the end of the war. Both were awarded the French Croix de Guerre (War Cross).

Welcome/Home WWI Speakers Contact Us

Events/Airshows

World War I aviation special eventsEvents/Airshows

Pilots/Aviators

Raoul Lufbery and other aviators Raoul Lufbery
Ace of Aces
Eddie Rickenbacker
26 victories
Quentin Roosevelt
Son of President KIA
Frank Luke
18 victories in 17 days
Eugene Bullard
1st African Am. Pilot
David Ingalls
1st US Navy Ace
List of USAS Pilots
Find a Relative
American WWI Pilots
Mini bios

USAS Research

United States Air Service research aids USAS Videos Reading List
WWI US Aviation
Related Links
WWI US Aviation
Credits War Wings
by Phillip W. Stewart
WWI Maps
USAS, USN, USMC Airfields
Payne Field
USAS Aerodromes now...
USAS Archives
Questions? Need Help?
American Expeditionary Forces
WWI Doughboys in France